Spin Art

Ever wanted to make your own spin art at home, but you didn't want to buy a kit? Good news! You don't need a kit to create spin art at home; you probably already have a lot of the materials at your home already, but if not, you can easily acquire them for cheap.

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Materials Needed

Materials that you need to make your own spin art at home:

*Paper material to create your spin art on; I always use white cardstock as it holds up better since it's thicker than regular printer paper

*Paint dispensers; I use condiment bottles I got from Dollar Tree, but mini squeeze bottles for sauces/candy making work great, too

*Paint; I use acrylic paint

*Spinner; I use a salad spinner from IKEA that I got for $5 or $6

*Drying area; since I don't have a drying rack, I use a laminated piece of construction paper/messy mat

That's all you need! I've seen plenty of kits selling for $20-$30. You can easily do your own spin art for less. I bought cardstock in bulk for a variety of projects (it was about $10). I bought 3 packs of the condiment bottles from Dollar Tree. As mentioned above, I got the salad spinner for around $6. I got 3 quart sized (32 oz) bottles of acrylic paint for about $6 a piece from Michael's. If you don't want to buy such a large bottle of paint, you can get a variety of 2 oz bottles of acrylic paint from Walmart; they sell Apple Barrel paint, many usually from $.50-$1. The "messy mat" cost me nothing, as I was able to laminate a piece of construction paper at school. If you aren't able to do that, you can easily use cardboard from a box or an empty cereal box. Spin art really doesn't have to cost a lot. The kits usually don't have a lot of paint. By making my own "kit," I have so much more materials that I can use for a variety of projects and activities, and it only cost me about $36. I think it's much more cost effective and much more worth it. Besides, I've given this homemade "kit" to some of the kids I babysit, and they love it; one of the girls noted that the store-bought kit someone gave her before made much more of a mess--the salad spinner contains all of the paint. It's great!

Directions

1. Gather your materials

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*Note: I tend to add some water to the paint in the dispenser so the paint isn't too thick; if the paint is too thick, it doesn't spread very well

2. Place your paper inside the salad spinner.

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3. Add paint (complementary colors, like red and green, will make a brownish color, so beware)

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4. Spin! Spin! Spin!

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5. Take your spin art out to dry. Ta-dah! You've made your own spin art! Keep creating as much spin art as you like, but the salad spinner can sometimes fill up with a bit much of paint, so keep an eye out. Have fun!

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